Translations

It is particularly important to translate the Underground Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto documents into English. The materials are being translated from the original languages (Polish, Yiddish, Hebrew, and German).

The translation of the Underground Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto is being done in cooperation with other academic and research centers around the world. It is a large-scale project that will take many years to complete.

The translation is based on the 38-volume Full Edition of the Ringelblum Archive. The entire task of translating the complete edition, is planned for a 10-year period.

Contact person: Katarzyna Person

THE RINGELBLUM ARCHIVE. UNDERGROUND ARCHIVE OF THE WARSAW GHETTO, VOL. 1

WARSAW GHETTO. EVERYDAY LIFE

„Warsaw Ghetto. Everyday Life” is a volume that opens a series of English edition of documents from the Ringelblum Archive – the Underground Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto. It contains seventy-one scientific documents on various aspects of everyday life in the Warsaw Ghetto. The book is accompanied by a DVD containing scans of documents from the volume located in the Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute.

Edited by: Katarzyna Person

Translated by: Anna Brzostowska, Katarzyna Gucio, Jerzy Giebułtowski, Helen Beer, Khayke Beburiah Wiegand, Vincent Homolka, Wojciech Tworek, Lena Watson

Table of Contents:

  1. Images from the Ghetto
  2. Refugees and Deportees
  3. House Committees
  4. Women
  5. Combating typhus
  6. Economy and finances
  7. Upbringing and education
  8. Jews and Poles. Assimilationists and Converts
  9. Jews and Germans
  10. The Jewish Order Service
  11. The „Thirteen”

THE RINGELBLUM ARCHIVE. UNDERGROUND ARCHIVE OF THE WARSAW GHETTO, VOL. 2

ACCOUNTS FROM BORDERLANDS, 1939-1941

In the second volume the reader will find testimonies from the years 1939–1942 documenting the situation on those territories of the Second Republic of Poland which between September 1939 and the German attack on USSR on 21st June 1914 were under Soviet occupation, and later under German rule. It concerns a bit over 50% of entire territory of pre-war Poland, inhabited by around 40% of Polish Jews. After September 1939, additionally at least 250 thousand Jews were staying on those territories. Predicting rising anti-Jewish repressions, they fled from Polish territories remaining under German occupation. Testimonies collected in the Warsaw Ghetto by the team of Emanuel Ringelblum in the majority of cases are being published for the first time.

Edited by: Andrzej Żbikowski

Translated by: Sara Arm, Anna Ciałowicz, Julia Jakubowska, Sylwia Szymańska, Andrzej Żbikowski

Table of Contents:

  1. General situation of refugees at the Soviet-occupied territories
  2. Białystok and the Western Belarus
  3. Vilna
  4. Lvov and south-eastern regions